Review: Prince Caspian By C.S. Lewis


THE TRIUMPHANT RETURN TO NARNIA

IN THE HOUR OF GREATEST NEED THE PEVENSIE SIBLINGS ARE CALLED BACK TO NARNIA TO SAVE THE DAY ONCE AGAIN

 
Book CoverPrince Caspian
(The Chronicles Of Narnia, Book 4)

C.S. Lewis

Genre: Children’s, Juvenile Fantasy
Publisher: HarperCollins
Format: Paperback, 224 Pages
Date: 1st February 2009 (First Published 1951)

ISBN-10: 0007323115
ISBN-13: 978-0007323111

 
Purchase From: Amazon | Book Depository
 

Let’s get the trivia out of the way first. Prince Caspian was the second book of The Chronicles Of Narnia to be published, in 1951, though the events narrated therein make it chronologically the fourth story of the series. So being, effectively, the direct sequel to The Lion, The Witch And The Wardrobe, the book marks the inevitable return to Narnia of the four Pevensie siblings; Peter, Susan, Edmund and Lucy. After all, once a king (or queen) in Narnia, always a king (or queen) in Narnia.

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Review: The Horse And His Boy By C.S. Lewis


THE STAND OUT TALE OF THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA

A GRIPPING JOURNEY OF SELF DISCOVERY FOR TWO YOUNG HEROES IN A RACE AGAINST TIME TO THWART A NEFARIOUS CONSPIRACY

 

Book CoverThe Horse And His Boy
(The Chronicles Of Narnia, Book 3)

C.S. Lewis

Genre: Children’s, Juvenile Fantasy
Publisher: HarperCollins
Format: Paperback, 252 Pages
Date: 20th March 2012 (First Published 1954)

ISBN-10: 0007323085
ISBN-13: 978-0007323081

 
Purchase From: Amazon | Book Depository
 

If anyone were to ask me which of the seven books of The Chronicles Of Narnia is the best, without hesitation I would reply, The Horse And His Boy; although I would have no argument with anyone who considered Prince Caspian to be the better book. While they are both excellent reads, what elevates the former over the latter, as well as the other Narnia books, is its unique status within the series. It is the only instalment whose premise doesn’t involve young protagonists from our world being transported to the world of Narnia at a time of great need. In fact, though the story takes place during the reign of the Pevensie siblings, and features cameo appearances by them, Narnia only plays a small part in the book’s setting and plot. The story unfolds mostly in the land of Calormen, far to the south, before moving to Archenland and Narnia, much later on.

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Review: The Lion The Witch And The Wardrobe By C.S. Lewis


THE MOST INFLUENTIAL CHILDREN’S STORY EVER TOLD

C.S. LEWIS’ TIMELESS TALE OF GOOD OVERCOMING EVIL IN A MAGICAL LAND, IS A MUST READ BOOK FOR READERS, YOUNG AND OLD

 

Book CoverThe Lion, The Witch And The Wardrobe
(The Chronicles Of Narnia, Book 2)

C.S. Lewis

Genre: Children’s, Juvenile Fantasy
Publisher: HarperCollins
Format: Paperback, 208 Pages
Date: 12th March 2012 (First Published 1950)

ISBN-10: 0007323123
ISBN-13: 978-0007323128

 
Purchase From: Amazon | Book Depository
 

To say that C.S. Lewis’ The Lion, The Witch And The Wardrobe has a very special place in my heart would be a major understatement. It was the first novel that I ever read, when I was just seven years old, igniting a lifelong interest in fantasy literature. It is perhaps the most influential children’s fantasy book ever written, and its enduring popularity has ensured that it has never been out of print since it was first published, six decades ago.

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Review: The Magician’s Nephew By C.S. Lewis


MARKING THE BEGINNING OF THE ADVENTURES IN THE MAGICAL LAND OF NARNIA.

Regardless of whether it’s book one or book six, The Magician’s Nephew is an enjoyable but redundant tale.

 

Book CoverThe Magician’s Nephew
(The Chronicles Of Narnia, Book 1)

C.S. Lewis

Genre: Children’s, High Fantasy
Publisher: HarperCollins
Format: Kindle Edition, 192 Pages
Date: 5th May 2009

ASIN: B002UZ5J7W
 

 
Purchase From: Amazon UK | Amazon US
 

The Magician’s Nephew by C.S. Lewis is a book that requires little introduction. This children’s classic was the sixth book published in The Chronicles Of Narnia series in 1955, and is chronologically the first Narnia tale, pre-dating the events of The Lion, The Witch, And The Wardrobe. It is arguably the weakest of the seven Narnia stories, and I believe this is principally due to its status as a prequel novel.

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